Rose distillation in Turkey

In June 2000 I saw the full production cycle of Turkish rose oil.

I was invited there by Butch Owen (above), an American who lived in Turkey
for around 20 years. Since he speaks the language like a native, he has direct
contacts with growers, producers and miscellaneous other people. He is treated
by them as an old friend, which of course opened doors that might be closed to
other people.

The organisation that I visited was the State controlled co-operative. They
have a large office, laboratory and cosmetics production building. On the same
site they process small amounts of rose concrete. They have 5 distillation
plants in the Isparta area (consisting of a total of 80 primary stills and 10
secondary stills). The roses come into those from the surrounding small farms.

It was interesting that the small family-owned farms did not have vast fields of
roses, but rather they had many small fields interspersed by fields growing all
kinds of other crops. Each farm seemed to have just a few rose fields making
self distillation uneconomic. Hence the reason for co-operative distillation facilities.
 

The bushes are extremely prolific in flowers and keep producing roses for a few
weeks. This means picking occurs almost every day. It was interesting that the
rose bushes are left in the same location for 40 years or more, adding just
animal manure as fertiliser. They trim the bushes back annually, and every 8 or
10 years they are cut to the ground.
The rose bushes are about waist height making for easier picking. This is
mostly done by the women from the villages who are paid by weight picked.
The speed that they can pluck the flowers from the bushes is quite remarkable.
 

The night before we arrived it had rained hard, so we thought harvesting might
be postponed. However, the following morning it was sunny and they picked
the flowers as normal. We were told it just meant they had to get them to the
still a bit quicker than normal to prevent fermentation.

Picking begins before the sun rises and stops around 11 A.M. Once picked, the
roses are put in sacks which are taken by tractor trailers or old farm trucks to
the nearest distillation plant. On arrival the sacks are quickly emptied into 40
year old seasoned copper stills. The first distillation is in a range of about 8
large stills. Each takes 1500 kilos of water and 500 kilos of rose petals.

This first distillation takes about an hour and three quarters and produces a
layer of thick brown rose extract around an inch deep in the glass flask. This
material is so valuable that it is never sold - despite the hype of some
aromatherapy suppliers. When the first distillation is complete the distillation
water is pumped to the second distillation units. Here the 'cohobation' occurs
for about half an hour; the final result being rose hydrosol and the second rose
oil. Later, the first and second rose oils are blended to get the final product -
rose otto.
Photographs © 2000 copyright of Butch Owen and Martin Watt.

As is common with distillation, the rosewater and oil do not smell so good
when fresh. The beautiful fragrance takes a few weeks to appear. In the case
of rose oil it can take a year or more to obtain its best aroma and it continues
to improve if stored properly.

The distillation plant is set above concrete channels in the floor. These are
where the waste still jacketing water and the spent roses are discharged. The
channels lead into an earth lagoon outside the factory. Once the waste dries
out, the farmers use this on their fields as mulch.
The hot rosewater is led off into large stainless steel storage tanks (above
right) direct from the still. This of course reduces the possibility of atmospheric
microbial contamination.

The Turks prize this rose oil so much that these factories are only open a few
weeks of each year. Government regulations prohibit using these stills for
anything else for fear of contaminating them. So imagine a factory in the West
being open for just a couple weeks and what that will do to the price of the end
product. In addition it requires approximately 4 metric tons of rose petals to
make one kilogram of rose otto. So when people think rose oil is so expensive,
perhaps you can see why.

At their H.Q. I saw the processing of the flowers into concrete. This was only a
small scale operation just to keep some of their big overseas customers happy.
Here the rose flowers are placed into a large mixing machine where they are
rotated along with Hexane as a solvent. The liquid extract is filtered and
extracted twice with hexane before finally pouring into steel cans. The hexane
solvent is recycled and used over and over again. The cans have a hole cut out
of the lid so that as the liquid sets hard, the residual hexane given off just
evaporates. This 'concrete' is then shipped to their customers who will
reprocess it to make an absolute.

This organisations rose oil is certainly of the highest quality which is of course
reflected in the price. You can get what is called "village oil", this is produced in
small direct fired stills in the villages, but its fragrance is dreadful for
aromatherapy purposes. It has these caramelised notes that certain perfumers
prefer, but the caramel notes are due to the overheating of the oil in the old
stills. I was told by several experts that certain private producers in Turkey
purchase these village oils, blend them with cheaper imported rose oil before
reselling it as "Turkish otto". This fraud can easily be detected with GC testing,
but my guess is a lot of this lower grade blended oil finds its way into the
aromatherapy market.

Also in their HQ, they have production facilities for making soaps, shampoos
and skin creams using rose oil and water. It was nice to see that they also have
laboratories capable of excellent quality control and research on their products.
While we were there, the chemist was doing challenge testing for bacteria and
testing of PH on some products. The entire process in the products lab. is
mechanical and none of the products are touched by human hands. The
laboratory is proud of the ISO 9002 Certificate they have on the wall in the
entrance way.

The main analysis of rose oils was undertaken by the Aromatic and Medicinal
Plant and Drug Research Center at Andalou University. This department has
some of the finest phytochemical laboratories in the world and really there is
little they cannot test for on botanical extracts.

To summarise: Turkish rose oil and rosewater from the then State controlled
organisation are among the finest products one could wish for. I have visited
several growing areas around the world, but was most impressed by their set-
up and the pride they took in the quality of their products. If in time the rose
oil production is privatised, and with the general development in Southern
Turkey, it remains to be seen if this reduces the availability of this fine oil.
Clearly the small farmers would get a far higher income working in and for
their fast developing tourist industry.
 
So what's Rose oil good for then?

Here is an extract from the basic information files on essential oils. The
professional monographs of course have far more.

BATHS: Rose makes a wonderfully relaxing, luxurious bath, perfect for relaxing
after a stressful day at work. A few drops in the bath can leave a long lasting
gentle fragrance on the skin, ideal for parties or for seduction.

MASSAGE: An ideal oil for massage. It is perfect for helping relieve stress-
related conditions and for mild psychological ailments. Due to its strong
influence on the mind and emotions, it may help improve recovery from a wide
range of illnesses for example: Anxiety, P.M.S. menstrual disorders of nervous
origin, insomnia, headaches, and nervous palpitations. It is good for soothing
skin care preparations, for mild burns and minor skin abrasions, for hay fever
and allergic skin disorders and finally as an aphrodisiac.

A trip to Turkey - Rose production and other sights.

Here are the notes of a talk I gave about the trip to Turkey in June 2000. Some
of this is in the file above about Rose oil production, but there is some
additional information which some may find of interest. The notes are only
slightly tweaked to take account of the passage of time.

This article should be packed with photos, but Butch is always too busy with
planting, hunting, writing on facebook, etc. to let me know which ones of his
hundreds that I can use.

I had been invited to Turkey by Butch Owen, an American who has lived in
Turkey for 18 plus years. At that time he had a large business based in Ankara.
He dealt in bulk essentials oils, herb teas and other Turkish products most of
which were shipped to the USA. He was also the Turkish director of Sata travel,
a large agency that handles US military travel worldwide. He has spent most of
his life in the US military mainly as an officer in their police services, and been
in many countries as a result, but at heart he is still a country boy having
grown up in the backwoods of Alabama. Since our trip, he has married again
and settled in his retirement in Tennessee. Having come from an environment
where herbal medicine was the only medication for many, he has a deep
interest in botanical medicine and ensuring he only deals in unadulterated
products. This led to an association being formed with Professor Baser of
Andalou University who tested all his oils - more on that later.

Butch speaks Turkish like a native and had direct contacts with growers,
producers and miscellaneous other people. He is treated by them as an old
friend, which of course opened doors that might be closed to other people. He
was well known in the bars of Ankara frequented by Military and political
figures alike.

His language skills got a speeding fine reduced by half because he chatted up
the cop who pulled us over, whereas a group of Turkish politicians who bombed
by us at very high speed, got hit for the full amount. I think as a little aside
that this was rather interesting as it showed the police force were defiantly
impartial. Many people have the impression that Turkey is almost a military
state, but this is far from the truth. In the UK we were fed a constant stream
of misinformation by our media about Turkey and other countries. Don’t
believe 1% of what you hear on the news or read in comics (some people call
them newspapers)!!

A short history:
The history of roses and rose oil production in turkey is ancient. Essential oils
have been produced in the Anatolian region as a home and village activity for
hundreds and possibly thousands of years. They used simple copper stills
consisting of two vessels one on top the other. The bottom vessel contains
plant material and water. The top one is filled with cold water and acts as the
condenser. As the oil condenses it is led out through a small copper tube.
These home stills were mainly used to produce a home made drink distilled
from fermented raisins, dried figs and mulberries.

No one knows how long rose oil has been produced in that area, but we do
have records showing that in the reign of king Midas (circa 700BC) that roses
were highly regarded. It is good to consider the known history of this region;
the oldest village in the world has been found in Turkey dated to around 6500
BC. Turkey has also been a meeting place of many ancient civilisations all
contributing a broad spectrum of knowledge on how to utilise plant materials.
The southern coastal area has numerous Ancient cities dating back to the dawn
of civilisation. It was on a river at Tarsus on the southern Mediterranean
Turkish coast that Cleopatra had her famous meeting with Antony. With her
reputation of enjoying fine perfumes, perhaps that might have contributed to
the choice of that location. This whole area produces fine wines and the plants
needed to produce perfumes and unguents.

To more modern times:
It is known that dealers in essential oils traded in the 1700s in Turkey.
However, the production of rose oil on a large scale was triggered by the
founder of modern turkey Kemal Ataturk. His mausoleum in Ankara is well
worth a visit, a very special place. He visited Isparta in the 1920s, saw the
local village production, and ordered the building of modern rose extraction
facilities.

An explanation of the term ‘otto’ often applied to rose oil: This comes from the
Ottoman empire and should only refer to an oil from that part of the world. The
term ‘attar’ should never apply to a hydro distilled oil. A true attar is an extract
originating in India containing rose and sandalwood, but the aromatherapy
world is packed with such deliberately misleading hype.

So here goes on rose oil itself

Before going to the Cappadocia region and to Isparta which is the big rose
production area, we called in at a couple of other places which I will tell you
about at the end. After those visits we then headed out for Isparta which is I
think around 250 miles south of Ankara and lies about 80 miles inland from the
southern Mediterranean coastal resorts. Turkey is in fact a very big country; we
were surprised to find we had done 2000 miles in a relatively limited area.
We got to Isparta town that night and thanks to Butch’s staff back home, we
were already booked into a nice central hotel THEN ($16.26 a night-about
£10.50). The next day we headed out of town to the state controlled rose
production co-operative called Gulbirlik. They have a large office, laboratory
and cosmetics production building. On the same site they also process small
amounts of rose concrete. They control 5 distillation plants in the Isparta area
(consisting of a total of 80 primary stills and 10 secondary stills). The roses
come into those from the surrounding small farms.

At Gulbirlik we had about 2 hours of meetings with the deputy director and
director. These people are political appointments and have little idea about how
western business works. All they seemed interested in was Butch trying to get
back their big US customers that were lost years previously because of internal
politics. However, poor old Butch trying to get them to commit to a base price
around which he could negotiate with US companies was just impossible. This
way of doing business is regrettable because they told us they could easily
double existing output from the 1,000 kilos this year, if they had the
customers. Currently most of their production goes to France. Knowing what I
do about the French trade in essential oils, I think you would be hard put to
get an unadulterated Turkish rose oil back out of that country.

After lunch we were taken out to one of the distillation plants some distance
out in the country. It was interesting that the small family-owned farms did not
have vast fields of roses, but rather they had many small fields interspersed by
fields growing all kinds of other crops. Each farm seemed to have just a few
rose fields making self distillation uneconomic. Hence the reason for co-
operative distillation facilities.

The night before we arrived it had rained hard, so we thought harvesting might
be postponed. However, the following morning it was sunny and they picked
the flowers as normal. We were told it just meant they had to get them to the
still a bit quicker than normal to prevent fermentation occurring.

The rose bushes are about waist height making for easier picking. This is
mostly done by the women from the villages who are paid by weight picked.
The speed that the women can pluck them off the bushes is quite remarkable.
The bushes are extremely prolific in flowers and they keep producing roses for
several weeks. This means they have to be repicked almost every day. It was
interesting that the rose bushes are left in the same location for 40 years or
more, just adding animal manure as fertiliser. They trim the bushes back
annually and every 8 or 10 years they cut them to the ground. The Roses are
all Rosa damascena variety kazanlik. This is the same variety that the
Bulgarians use and is believed to have been developed in Bulgaria originally
part of the Ottoman empire. Despite being the same variety, the chemical
composition of the oil produced in Turkey is different and many consider it
superior in fragrance to the Bulgarian oils.

Rose picking begins before the sun rises and stops around 11 a.m. Once
picked, the roses are put into sacks which are then taken by tractor trailers or
old farm trucks to the nearest distillation plant. This site of stacks of sacks of
pink roses is quiet wonderful.

Upon arrival the sacks are quickly unloaded onto a high floor overlooking the
stills. From here they are emptied into the 40 year old seasoned copper stills.
The first distillation is done in a range of about 8 large stills. Each takes 1500
kilos of water and 500 kilos of rose petals.

This first distillation takes about an hour and three quarters and produces a
layer of thick brown rose extract around an inch deep in the glass flask. This
material is so valuable that it is never sold despite the hype you will hear from
some aromatherapy suppliers.

When the first distillation is complete, the distillation water is pumped to the
second distillation units. Here the cohabitation occurs for about half an hour;
the final result being rose hydrosol and the second rose oil. Later, the first and
second rose oils are blended to get the final product - rose otto.

As is common with distillation, the rosewater and oil do not smell too good
when fresh. The beautiful fragrance takes a few weeks to appear. In the case
of rose oil it can take a year or more to obtain its best aroma and it continues
to improve if stored properly. The oil I saw distilled in June will not be sold until
the following summer. Incidentally, I visited Kent (UK) to see the English
Lavender oil distilled. As with rose that also does not smell too good when it is
fresh. It takes a few months to develop its best aroma.

The rose stills are set above concrete channels in the floor. These are where
the waste still jacketing water and the spent roses are discharged. The
channels lead into an earth lagoon outside the factory. Once the reside dries
out, the farmers use this on their fields as mulch.

The hot rosewater is led off into large stainless steel storage tanks direct from
the still. This of course reduces the possibility of atmospheric microbial
contamination. Despite this, there is no way I would advocate the internal use
of this rosewater unless it had got a proper preservative added.

The Turks prize this rose oil so much that these factories are only open a few
weeks of each year. Government regulations prohibit using these stills for
anything else for fear of contaminating them. So imagine a factory in the west
being open for just a couple weeks and what that will do to the price of the end
product. In addition, it requires approximately 4 metric tons of rose petals to
make one kilogram of rose otto. So when people think rose oil is so expensive,
perhaps you can see why.

At the Gulbirlik H.Q. I saw the processing of the flowers into concrete. This was
only a small scale operation just to keep some of their big French customers
happy. Here the rose flowers are placed into a large mixing machine where
they are rotated along with hexane as a solvent. The liquid extract is filtered
and extracted twice with hexane before finally pouring into steel cans. The
hexane solvent is recycled and used over and over again. The cans have a hole
cut out of the lid so that as the liquid sets hard, the residual hexane just
evaporates. This concrete is then shipped to their customers who will reprocess
it to make an absolute.

The Turkish co-op distilled rose oil is certainly of the highest quality which is of
course reflected in the price. You can get what is called "village oil", this is
produced in small direct fired stills in the villages, but its fragrance is dreadful
for aromatherapy purposes. It has these caramelised notes that certain
perfumers prefer, but the caramel notes are due to the overheating of the oil in
the old stills. I was told by several experts that some private suppliers in
Turkey purchase these village oils, blend them with Turkish hydro distilled oils
(and even imported Bulgarian rose oil) before reselling it. This can easily be
detected with GC testing, but my guess is a lot of this lower grade blended oil
finds its way into the aromatherapy market.

Also in the co-operative’s H.Q. they have production facilities for making soaps,
shampoos and skin creams using rose oil and water. It was nice to see that
they also have modern laboratories capable of excellent quality control and
research on their products. The entire process in the products lab. is
mechanical and none of the products are touched by human hands. The
laboratory is proud of the iso 9002 certificate they have on the wall in the
entrance.

While we were there, the chemist was doing challenge testing for bacteria and
testing of ph on some products. I have always nagged people about the
dangers of using unpreserved hydrosols. While there the chemist tested out
different levels of benzoate in the rosewater so that we could see how it
affected it. The ph level hardly changed and at less than 0.5% there was little
perceptible change in fragrance although I thought it improved the potency of
the fragrance slightly. I can’t emphasise too strongly how important it is to
only use these hydrosols if you know they are safe from microbial
contamination. Many aromatherapy suppliers either don’t bother to test, or sell
them with preservatives but as "totally natural" knowing full well they are not.
The main analysis of the rose oils is undertaken by Prof. Baser at Andalou
University under contract. His department has some of the finest
phytochemical laboratories in the world. There is little they can’t test for on
botanical extracts.

Turkish rose oil and rosewater from the state co-operative is the most highly
controlled and excellent quality product one could wish for in aromatherapy. I
have visited several growing areas around the world, but was most impressed
by their set-up and the pride they took in the quality of their products.

Following our trip to the distillation plant we were taken the village of Kilic to
meet the mayor who Butch also knew. This village was the centre of an
important agricultural area. The mayor is the person in charge of production
and was a key political figure. I asked him about what other things they
produced? It included all the normal vegetable one would expect in a warm
fertile area, but also several citrus fruits, cherries, melons and walnuts. This
part of Turkey has a staggering range of fruits, nuts and vegetables. They have
a wonderful cherry juice which is everywhere in cartons and other soft drinks -
wish we could get it. They also have the biggest and best hazelnuts I have ever
seen. When I Asked the mayor where most of their exports went, the answer
was France!

Turkey does also produce other essential oils. Three types of origanum
(marjorana, onites and multiflorium) grow wild, as do salvia fruticosa and
rosmarinus officinalis. Butch took me to one massive ruined Greek city and all
around the ruins was wild oregano. The locals let their cattle graze among
these ruins, so I guess the meat would be ready seasoned. He has also found
one grower of lavender, but guess where the whole production goes - France.
They have a huge citrus industry, but currently do not produce the essential
oils. I would suspect that Turkish neroli would be wonderful because of the
climate. Years ago they did produce jasmin, but it seems that no longer occurs.

Now back to the earlier part of my trip.
The day before we headed to Ispata, Butch took me to meet Professor Baser at
the aromatic and medicinal plant research centre at Anadolu university. I was
really delighted to be given this opportunity because he is one of the top
phytochemists in the world. He has 4 plants named after him and so is also a
practical botanist. Believe me, I am rarely left in awe at scientists, but he is
really something special and is not an elitist academic. This man who is head of
a huge plant research department took 4 hours out of his schedule to show us
his department and even entertain us to lunch. Prof. Baser is a true
phytochemist in that he uses that magic word “synergy” when talking about
chemicals in plants. You will only find true experts in that field who
acknowledge such a thing exists. In other words they do not just look at
individual chemicals and how they work, but look at the wider picture. It was
interesting that Prof. Baser did part of his training at Chelsea university UK,
one of the few courses that teach practical phytochemistry. He also knew the
person that taught me chemistry when I did herbal training.

The laboratories he controls are among the finest in the world with millions of
pounds worth of equipment. I have never seen so much advanced equipment
anywhere, from the latest glcs right through to mass spectrometer and atomic
structure detection equipment. On the more practical side they have all types
of extraction equipment from ordinary distillation right through to co2 and
even spray drying. They have a commercial scale fractionation plant; a type of
closed still that can remove undesirable components from essential oils. For
example, if it is a bad year for oregano oil, they can remove unwanted
chemicals from an oil in order to boost the level of carvacrol which the price of
the oil is based on. This is not adulteration because nothing is being added;
rather it is a natural form of standardisation. At the other end of the scale they
have wonderful microdistillation equipment so that a student can gather a few
leaves from a plant, distil a few drops of oil and then analyse it, or if plant
hunting in the wild, a little piece can be bought back for analysis.

Just to round things off, they can run any kind of tests on a plant extract, from
toxicity using in vitro testing, or testing on rats if necessary, incidentally they
rarely do this unless it is vital. They can do dermal testing in vitro, or on the
thousands of students in the university who are always happy to earn a bit of
extra cash. Finally they can do therapeutic efficacy testing. An ongoing project
is testing one variety of Turkish oregano oil for anti cancer activity. They have
already published a paper where rats with melanoma have healed after the
application of Turkish oregano oil. Prof. Baser told me he was so convinced that
oregano had anti cancer activity that him and his family take a glass of the
distillation water every. Please bear in mind though they have access to the
freshly distilled water, I would not use commercial stuff for this. However, if
one can get this variety of dried herb, it is dead easy to make a tea from it
which is more or less the same as a hydrosol.

I was given a copy of a book his students put together to celebrate his 50th
birthday. I can’t tell you what a pleasure it was to talk to such an eminent but
still practical scientist.

Next stop before Isparta was the tomb of King Midas. Now thought to be
his fathers tomb.

We were driving out of Ankara and passed a sign to Gordion and to its ancient
palace. Butch asked me if I would like to have a look. The palace is nothing
much; it is one of those ancient sites that has been built and rebuilt a hundred
times. There are just some large walls left, excavated from the mound which
has built up over two thousand odd years. However, there was also a tiny sign
pointing to a village a couple of miles away saying ‘tomb of King Midas’. Well
we had to take a look at that. Within a couple of minutes of driving towards
this village you could clearly see the tomb, it was very much like Silbury hill
(UK) in that this 53 metre high burial mound dominates the valley.

King Midas supposedly founded the ancient city of Ancyra, the modern Ankara.
He is referred to in Assyrian records as Mitas of Mushki, who paid tribute to the
Assyrians after being defeated in battle. He is thought to have reigned from
725 BC to 696 BC. He is the figure of legend who is supposed to have had
problems because everything he touched turned to gold including his food. This
is of course a fairy tail, but the person was real. Midas is supposed to have
cleansed himself of the curse by washing in the local river. Several of the rivers
in this part of Turkey contain gold deposits washed down from the mountains,
thus in ancient times, gold and silver were more plentiful than now.

We parked the car by the side of the road, and got out. There growing out of
the gap between the road and the kerb was a beautiful pink wild rose bush in
full flower. The roses were beautifully fragrant. This was peculiar because even
in Turkey wild roses are like ours in the UK with hardly any fragrance. When we
told Prof. Baser about this he was very excited and told us he would try and
get a sample. This excitement was because he suspected that roses were
widely used in ancient Turkey, but they had no proof of if the variety was close
to kazanlik or not. Such a find could be very important historically being close
to such an important tomb.

Some year or so after this, the BBC made a program about a feast that was
held as part of the burial process. The nature of the feast was known from
pollen and other remnants excavated in the assembly area opposite the tomb
entrance. Doubtless flowers were part of the ceremony and who knows of
seeds might have kept self propagating over the thousands of years. There is
no other housing close to the tomb to disrupt natural processes.

Next we visited the museum and then crossed the road to enter the mound.
This huge mound had never been robbed or been excavated until the middle
1950s - strange for a tomb sticking out like a sore thumb and in a populated
rural area. Tomb robbing has always been a village pastime anywhere in the
ancient world. This is something to consider when I tell you about other things.

The entrance is a long tunnel mined into the mound. As we got to the entrance
I said to Butch “this is on an earth energy centre” I can feel these natural
energies in a similar way to dowsing. The central chamber is an amazing
structure and is I think unique. The tomb chamber itself was built of multiple
walls of juniper logs filled in with rocks and with stone roof supports. Many of
those 2500 year old logs are still there. The whole structure looked to me like a
massive electrical insulator. When the tomb was first excavated it was found
packed with beautiful gold treasure as well as the remains of the king. The
whole lot is now in Ankara museum, but what remains is some kind of energy
centre. Not uncommon of course in earthquake zones, but the ancients sure
knew how to utilise these emanations. Continued.
Butch took several photos in the tomb and outside. I didn’t take my camera in
because I knew I could get copies from him. Later after I got home, Butch said
the whole reel had come out blank. Yet other films on the trip were fine, so it
wasn’t the camera.

Later at the hotel, we started searching our pockets. I had mislaid one of the
leaves we picked off the rose bush to show Prof. Baser. I then found the file of
rose oil we were both given at Gulbirlik and had a quick sniff of mine.
Immediately I knew it had changed. Butch checked his and then compared it to
the main batch of oil he had left in the car. The sample in the car was quiet
different to the sample we took into that tomb. I do not know what happened,
but am sure whatever this radiation is, that it had affected the oil. I have here
samples of the two oils. One is the file that went into the tomb, the other the
batch that it came from. You may only be able to tell the difference if you have
a good nose. I won’t say anything about the difference you tell me what you
think. I must say that I am certain all the talk about ‘energies’ in essential oils
and their healing effects via this pathway is just aromatherapy hype. However,
earth energy centres do exist and have effects as yet largely unknown. I can
also tell you that I felt and looked 5 years younger when I came back from this
trip, people even commented how much less strained I looked. So those that
are contemplating a facelift, perhaps a quick trip to turkey and a visit to this
tomb might be cheaper and far less painful.
-----------------------------------------------
Tue, 10 Mar 2015
Dear Martin Watt,
There are some small changes between the lines. But the method of the
production and the rose is same. For example, we have built a new rose
concrete plant out of the city. Its capacity is 2 times more than old one. We
have put new second distillation boilers which are continuous system. We put
new boilers which is produced aromatic compound from the waste water of
second distillation. But the most important thing is we have a large cosmetic
production line under Rosense brand. We have exports too many countries with
Rosense products.

May be you need to come and visit Isparta again. :)
rosense.com gulbirlik.com
 
Source and copyright: aromamedical.org
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